Popular Personal Finance Blogs to Check Out

Some of the best online places to read up on money issues

Anyone can write a blog,financeblogs_featured and anyone can give advice about money … but which personal finance blogs strike the best mix of both personality and credibility?

In general, blogs become popular if their content and topics resound for their audience. The same goes for personal finance blogs. With such an impactful subject, it’s best to also garner a certain level of trustworthiness over time. Here are a few of the best personal finance blogs out there today:

The Consumerist
This blog site has had a huge following for years, which strengthens its credibility. In fact, The Consumerist made Time magazine’s list of the 25 best financial blogs in 2011, and also tops the 2016 list from Wise Bread — a noteworthy financial blog in its own right. Wise Bread uses factors such as site traffic, authority (measured by how often other credible sites link to the blog), social media influence (determined by number of followers) and reader loyalty (found using the number of RSS subscribers) to compose a “Wise Score” to rank popular financial blogs. Out of a possible 100, the Consumerist notched a 98.63.

According to Brad Tuttle of Time, followers love The Consumerist’s sharp-tongued attitude and how it caters to the habits of its audience, referencing its popular tournament-style contests, such as “Worst Company in America,” and click-bait headlines like “Who Sucks the Most: AT&T or Verizon?”

“The Consumerist’s followers love to complain,” Tuttle explains.

Check it out at https://consumerist.com.

Christian Personal Finance
This religious-sounding but not entirely religious blog is also on Wise Bread’s most recent list. Followers love its catered yet not pushy content.

“Despite the name, this blog doesn’t overwhelm readers with a Christian message (it’s present in some posts but not all),” says Cameron Huddleston of Kiplinger Personal Finance in her own article listing her favorite financial blogs. “For the most part, it just offers great personal finance advice anyone should follow, regardless of his or her religious views.”

Visit http://christianpf.com to see for yourself.

Money Under 30
This blog has been imparting wisdom to young people for more than 10 years, explaining the basics of how to break bad money habits and get on a path to financial stability. As with most blogs, the writer, Dave Weliver, derives his content from personal experiences; something his fans greatly appreciate.

“He’s still dedicated to helping 20-somethings avoid the money mistakes he made when he was younger,” Huddleston says.

Read some of Weliver’s articles at http://www.moneyunder30.com.

Mr. Money Mustache
Despite writing under an alter ego, Mr. Money Mustache is beloved by readers for his unapologetic authenticity.

“His name is Pete and he’s from Canada, but he prefers to describe himself as ‘a 30-something retiree who now writes ’bout how we can all live a frugal yet bada** life of leisure,’” references Miriam Ballesteros of the award-winning personal finance management site moneyStrands.

Indulge in Pete’s entertaining financial insight at http://www.mrmoneymustache.com.

Good Financial Cents
Despite the fact that this blog is written by a professional in the financial industry, it is a favorite of many, thanks to its wide range of relevant topics that noticeably lack fancy jargon.

“Certified financial planner and author Jeff Rose writes about investing, saving for retirement and paying down debt in terms anyone can understand,” Huddleston explains.

Find out more at http://www.goodfinancialcents.com.

As the number of personal finance publications shrinks and the field of financial blogs explodes, try these five sites first the next time you need credible monetary advice.

Used with Permission. Published by IMN Bank Adviser Includes copyrighted material of IMakeNews, Inc. and its suppliers.

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