The True Value of a College Education

Is higher education worth the cost?
As tuition at universities and both public and private colleges rises, so does student debt—this begs the question: is a college education valuable enough to make it worthwhile?

The second edition of the Gallup-Purdue Index from 2015 found that 50 percent of college graduates surveyed nationwide strongly agreed that college was worth the investment; however, the answers varied based on the type of institution they attended, when they graduated, and how much undergraduate debt they accumulated. But do the statistics support this overall opinion? In general, the answer is yes.

A 2016 study from Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz via the National Bureau of Economic Research found that since the Great Recession, only about 9 percent of recent college graduates have begun their careers in a low-skilled service job. Furthermore, Brittany Hackett of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Advisors summarized report findings that about 40 percent of recent college graduates were employed in the two highest-paid tiers of jobs, compared with only 18 percent of those without degrees. Additionally, more than half of those in the workforce without a college degree are working within the lowest paying and skill categories of jobs—double the amount of college-degree holders.

That same study from Abel and Dietz found that even the underemployed college graduates are making more than those without a degree in the same fields. Almost a quarter of them hold positions in fields making more than $55,000 per year, in contrast to the 9.8 percent of workers without a college degree that make the same. Making those numbers even more significant is that 59% percent of student loan borrowers owe less than $20,000 in debt, so the average debt-to-income ratio is very manageable, according to Jason Furman, chairman of the White House’s Council of Economic Advisors.

More research, this time from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, showed that a staggering 97 percent of all 2.9 million “good jobs” (defined as those paying more than $53,000 annually for a full-time, full-year worker) that were added since the economic downturn in 2010 went to college graduates. Significantly, “good jobs” made up nearly half of the total jobs added during that time of recovery. Additionally, researchers Anthony P. Carnevale, Tamara Jayasundera and Artem Gulish also found that middle- and low-wage jobs were much more likely to be filled by workers with some college or an associate degree.

“The numbers are clear: postsecondary education is important for gaining access to job opportunities in the current economy, and job seekers with Bachelor’s degrees or higher have the best odds of securing good jobs,” their report stated.

What’s more, the return on investment increases in the long term. According to researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, new college graduates begin with earnings only slightly higher than high school graduates–about $5,000 to $6,000 more–but over time the gap increases.

“Higher education is one of the most important investments individuals can make for themselves and for our economy with bachelor’s degree recipients typically earning $500,000 more in present value over their lifetimes compared to high school graduates,” Furman said, solidifying the point.

Despite the studies, reports and evidence, the bottom line, and as much of the above has suggested, is that the true value of a college education is always dependent upon your unique outlook and circumstances.

Used with Permission. Published by IMN Bank Adviser Includes copyrighted material of IMakeNews, Inc. and its suppliers.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s